Author Archives: K.Varney

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2013 Atlanta Mini Maker Faire Welcomes Dale Dougherty As Special Guest

The 2013 Atlanta Mini Maker Faire returns to Atlanta Saturday, October 26, 2013, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The goal of the event is to bring together creators, innovators, tinkerers, hobbyists and amateur enthusiasts to learn, share, experiment and expand upon a great tradition of making in the South. This free, family-friendly day highlights Atlanta’s “Makers,” who range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers. The DIY (Do-It-Yourself) Movement is here and Makers are responsible for the revolution.

This year’s Faire will host more than 125 Makers who will share their inventions, creations and ideas in a hands-on learning environment. Atlanta Mini Maker Faire will include speakers, workshops and exhibits on topics such as robotics, green tech, electric vehicles, vintage computing, textile arts, robot battles, home fabrication and much more.

As an exciting addition to this year’s Faire, the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation will host Dale Dougherty, Editor and Publisher of MAKE Magazine and General Manager of Maker Media, as the featured speaker and special guest. Mr. Dougherty will take part in a discussion about the Maker Movement following the Georgia premiere of a documentary film, IF YOU BUILD IT, Saturday morning at 10:30 am.

 Part of the mission of the Maker Faire is to educate the next generation of innovators by giving increased access to design tools and resources to kids. With renewed emphasis on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) learning in schools and after-school programs all over the country, the Maker Movement provides the perfect framework and support system for continued involvement in project-based, experimental learning.

One representative of Maker education at this year’s Faire is Community Guilds, a non-profit organization based in Decatur, Ga. that teaches 21st century skills the old-fashioned way. Community Guilds will present their newly-created STE(A)M Truck™,  Atlanta’s first  mobile makerspace to inspire youth to learn science, technology, engineering, arts and math (STEAM). “We provide an opportunity for these students to walk outside their school and begin building, designing and tinkering using tools that promote STEAM by using technologies such as Arduinos, 3-D printers and laser cutters as well as arts and crafts not often found in today’s schools,” explains Jason Martin, founder and executive director of Community Guilds. For more information about the STE(A)M Truck™,  visit http://community-guilds.org.

Sponsored by Maker Media, Coca-Cola, Google, Turner Voices, The Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation and Mailchimp, the Atlanta Mini Maker Faire has grown immensely in its three years in Atlanta. Last year’s event saw 7,500 attendees and this year’s event is predicted to bring in more than 10,000 people from all over the Southeast. The community of Atlanta has come together to celebrate its Makers and inspire the next generation of DIY-ers.

 The event is made possible by Maker Media (makezine.com), non-profit partners and producers The Foundery (thefoundery.org), and event producers Kimberly Varney  (k.varney@thefoundery.org) and David Sluder (david.a.sluder@gmail.com). For more information about the Atlanta Mini Maker Faire and to get your free ticket of admission, visit the event website at http://makerfaireatl.com or contact atlminimakerfaire@gmail.com.

 About Maker Faire

Maker Faire is the Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth – a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker Movement. It’s a place where people show what they are making, and share what they are learning.

 The original Maker Faire event was held in San Mateo, CA and in 2013 celebrated its eighth annual show with some 900 makers and 120,000 people in attendance. World Maker Faire New York, the other flagship event, has grown in three years to more than 500 makers and 55,000 attendees. Community-driven, independently organized Mini Maker Faires are now being produced around the U.S. and the world – including right here in Atlanta. For more information about Maker Faire, visit http://makerfaire.com/.

 About MAKE Magazine

MAKE is the first magazine devoted entirely to Do-It-Yourself (DIY) technology projects. MAKE unites, inspires, informs and entertains a growing community of resourceful people who undertake amazing projects in their backyards, basements and garages. MAKE celebrates your right to tweak, hack and bend any technology to your will. For more information about MAKE Magazine, visit http://makezine.com/.

 About The Foundery

The Foundery is organized to provide opportunity and resources to promote education and entrepreneurship in the areas of industrial arts, making, and manufacturing. Our mission is accomplished through creation and support of makerspaces, STEAM programming, and Maker events. Executive Director of The Foundery, Kimberly Varney, is also the event producer for the 2013 Atlanta Mini Maker Faire. For more information about The Foundery, visit http://thefoundery.org.

Atlanta’s First Swap O Rama Rama at Atlanta Mini Maker Faire

Swap-O-Rama-Rama is an international community of clothing swaps and do-it-yourself workshops in which community explores creative reuse through the recycling of used clothing.

The Swap When you attend the swap bring at least one bag of your unwanted clothing and a small donation ($5 suggested). Every swap begins with a giant collective pile of clothing, the unwanted clothing of all who attend. Everyone is welcome to dive in and find their next new/used items from the pile. Take as little or as much clothing from this pile as you like, it’s all free.

DIY Workshops After you have chosen your new clothes slide on over to one of the sewing stations and attend a workshop. Learn to make modifications or totally transform your finds. Each swap features a variety of workshops by local artists who are there to share their sewing and modification secrets with you. All the materials you need to sew, embroider, bead, fix, repair, knit etc, are suppled.

On Site DIY Stations Swap-O-Rama-Rama also offers on site DIY with skilled artists to help you get started. You’ll find designers with sewing machines ready to teach you how to make modifications to your new/used duds. Or you might try the hand sew area and decoration station where you can learn to embroider, knit, crochet, etc.

Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation Sponsors GA Premier Of ‘If You Build It’

ARTHUR M. BLANK FAMILY FOUNDATION PRESENTS GEORGIA PREMIERE OF DOCUMENTARY FILM, IF YOU BUILD IT

Special Guest Dale Dougherty, Editor And Publisher Of MAKE Magazine, To Speak At Premiere With Filmmakers And Producers

The Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation is excited to join the Maker Movement as a sponsor of the 2013 Atlanta Mini Maker Faire on Saturday, October 26, 2013, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. This free, family-friendly day highlights Atlanta’s “Makers,” who range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers.

The Blank Foundation will host Dale Dougherty, editor and publisher of MAKE Magazine and general manager of Maker Media. The Atlanta Mini Maker Faire is excited to have Dougherty join them for the first time in their history as the festival continues to grow to one of the largest in the Southeast U.S.

As part of the Atlanta Mini Maker Faire, the foundation is sponsoring the Georgia premiere of a documentary film, IF YOU BUILD IT: A Year In The Life of One of America’s Most Innovative Classrooms. Directed by Patrick Craedon, the film follows 13 students, led by instructors and designer-activists Emily Pilloton and Matt Miller, as they work to address issues facing the community of rural Bertie County, the poorest in North Carolina. Pilloton and Miller lead local high school students through a year-long full-scale design and build project. The film offers an entertaining and emotionally compelling look at the difference “design thinking” can make in education systems across the country. It will bring together a national community to advocate for incorporating design thinking into the classroom.

The film will make its Georgia premiere on Saturday, October 26, 2013, at the Atlanta Mini Maker Faire. Following the film, the Blank Foundation will host a discussion about the Maker Movement and Maker education with Emily Pilloton and founder of MAKE Magazine, Dale Dougherty, moderated by Producer Christine O’Malley.

 Tickets for the premiere are available at https://ammfiybi.eventbrite.com/.

For more information about the film screening, contact event producer Kimberly Varney at k.varney@thefoundery.org.

 About the 2013 Atlanta Mini Maker Faire

The 2013 Atlanta Mini Maker Faire, to be held at the Georgia Institute of Technology campus, is a showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker Movement, a revival of Do-It-Yourself culture. The aim of AMMF is to entertain, inform, connect and grow the Atlanta community by bringing together hobbyists, engineers and amateur enthusiasts of all backgrounds. This year’s Faire will host more than 125 Makers who will share their inventions, creations and ideas in a hands-on learning environment. Atlanta Mini Maker Faire will feature speakers, workshops and exhibits on topics such as robotics, green tech, electric vehicles, vintage computing, textile arts, robot battles, home fabrication and much more.

 The Atlanta Mini Maker Faire will be held at the Tech Green at Clough Commons on the Georgia Institute of Technology campus. The event is made possible by MAKE Media (makezine.com) and non-profit partners and producers The Foundery (thefoundery.org). For more information about the Atlanta Mini Maker Faire and to get your free ticket of admission, visit the event website at http://makerfaireatl.com or contact atlminimakerfaire@gmail.com.

 About Maker Faire

Maker Faire is the Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth – a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker Movement. It’s a place where people show what they are making, and share what they are learning.

The original Maker Faire event was held in San Mateo, CA, and in 2013 celebrated its eighth annual show with some 900 makers and 120,000 people in attendance. World Maker Faire New York, the other flagship event, has grown in three years to more than 500 makers and 55,000 attendees. Community-driven, independently organized Mini Maker Faires are now being produced around the U.S. and the world – including right here in Atlanta. For more information about Maker Faire, visit http://makerfaire.com/.

About The Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation

The Blank Family Foundation has been a long-time investor in science education, the arts and programs that help kids find creative pathways into college and career opportunities. The foundation believes the Maker Movement can be a game-changer for many young people, opening up alternative ways to engage in science, technology, art and mathematics. Most of all, the Maker Movement is compelling because kids are leading the way. Something magical happens when young people get a chance to make things with their own hands, and makerspaces in Atlanta and throughout the Southeast U.S. are expanding to meet this demand. For more information about The Blank Foundation, visit www.blankfoundation.org/.

About IF YOU BUILD IT

From Patrick Creadon, the director of WORDPLAY and I.O.U.S.A. comes a captivating look at a radically innovative approach to education. Presented by Long Shot Factory and produced by Christine O’Malley and Neal Baer, the film debuted January 10, 2013, at IFC Center in New York City. For more information, visit www.IfYouBuildItMovie.com.

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Atlanta Journal-Constitution Highlights Atlanta Makers

“A whizzing and whirring full-size replica of R2-D2. A game changing medical research project. A bicycle made of wood. No relation? Think again.That’s just a tiny sample of the creations exploding from the fertile minds of Atlanta Makers.”
more here

Atlanta Robotics Solar Oven

 Atlanta Robotics Solar OvenThe Atlanta Robotics Solar Oven is capable of boiling half a gallon of water in 20 minutes. This solar oven can cook food using nothing but the power of the sun.  The high point of this solar cooker is that it automatically tracks the sun.  Motor power can also be supplied by solar power through the charging of a 12 volt battery via the on-board solar panel and charge controller.  Other solar ovens and cookers fall short of optimal efficiency due to the necessity of having to constantly adjust the reflector towards the sun by hand and requires you to be nearby during cooking.  With the Atlanta Robotics Solar Oven, the reflector is automatically adjusted to face the sun.  Cooking efficiency is maximized without the cook needing to be around.

Atlanta Robotics

Solar Oven project

 

 

Spotlight on Atlanta Makers in The Saporta Report

Atlanta’s Makers and the Next Industrial Revolution

Date: August 5th, 2013, 3:10 pm

By Ben Smith

In metro Atlanta and across the country, a revolution appears to be underway in libraries, recreation centers and workspaces. Amid the mass marketing from big box stores and online retailers and other forces that tell us what we need and how to order it, some people with skills are assembling for change.

Photo of handmade machine that launches Frisbees. (Credit: Decatur Makers)

Local makers created this machine that launches Frisbees. (Credit: Decatur Makers)

They are techno-geeks, artists and craftspeople. They wield computers, 3D printers, laser cutters, transistors, glue guns, canvasses, acrylic paints, embroidery hoops and other tools. They can be hobbyists, inventors or entrepreneurs.

The revolution is called the “Makers Movement,” a growing grassroots do-it-ourselves culture seeking to reinvent their pockets of consumer society.

Makers are making stuff, just like the old days when if you couldn’t make it, you didn’t have it. And they’re making a community, too, as they share expertise. They are forming nonprofit groups to gain access to sophisticated equipment (like 3D printers) and workspaces that are bigger than garages.

The third annual Atlanta Mini Maker Faire is sponsored by Google and will  feature workshops and exhibits on robotics, electric vehicles, computing, 3D printing, green technology, among other topics, is scheduled Oct. 26 at Georgia Tech. It’s not DragonCon, but more than 6,000 people who like to tinker showed up last year.

Atlanta Mini Maker Faire is organized by The Foundery, an Atlanta nonprofit based in Old Fourth Ward that promotes education and entrepreneurship in the areas of industrial arts, making, and manufacturing. Other sponsors include Coca Cola, Turner Broadcasting, MailChimp and the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation. Earlier this year in San Mateo, Calif., , the original Maker Faire, billed as “The Greatest Show and Tell on Earth,” drew 900 makers and 120,000 attendees.

Photo of Lew Lefton of Decatur Makers

Lew Lefton of Decatur Makers

Year-round, Atlanta is home to at least a half-dozen of these groups ranging from those with fully functioning “makerspaces,” such as Freeside and MASS Collective in south Atlanta, to those just getting off the ground.

“Our group is in the formulative stage and we’re definitely excited about it,” said Lew Lefton, president of Decatur Makers, one of the newer groups. “The community gains a lot by teaching itself these things.”

Maker groups hold fundraisers, lease workspaces, share, buy and accept donated equipment for common use. Expert members training for free or at a fraction of the cost of university or adult learning programs.

If you want to get in touch with your inner Scout or 4H-er, this is the group for you and your kids. They may be better than you at hacking a robot out of a coffee can.

A return to shop class, in the community

Decatur Makers has incorporated as a Georgia nonprofit and has filed for tax-exempt status under federal law. It is currently seeking its own permanent workspace and training center.

Decatur Makers bills itself as the first “family friendly” maker’s group in metro Atlanta, one that actively caters to school children and their parents. Lefton said the idea of starting a makerspace in Decatur grew out of his involvement with other parent mentors working with area high school robotics teams.

Logo for Freeside Atlanta

Makers are challenging our acceptance of universal products (with barcodes) by inventing one-of-a-kind items. Freeside is a group of makers in Atlanta.

Advocates who’ve bemoaned the loss of domestic and creative arts and crafts programs, such as metalworking, in public schools say makers programs could be a way of exposing this generation of children to traditional handwork. Instead of waiting for the next app, they can apply themselves to a creative challenge. Maybe the next Steve Jobs is growing up in Atlanta.

For adults trying to reinvent themselves in a fledgling economy, makerspaces could provide training.

“We just did a C++ class,” said Steven Peters, a board member of Geekspace Gwinnett, of a popular programming language. “That’s something you’d probably thousands of dollars to go to college for or to pay for an adult-ed type of class. It’s probably going to be $100.”

Like Decatur Makers, Geekspace is looking for a workspace of its own. Currently it operates out of The Work Spot, a “co-working” space it shares with other individuals and groups in Duluth.

“For the electronics hackers, we have servers, sandboxed networking equipment, soldering stations, oscilloscopes and several testbed power supplies,” Geekspace offers on its website. “?For the makers, we have two 3D printers, a metal lathe, a CNC [manufacturing] mill, sanders, grinders, a reflow oven and a platoon’s worth (30+) of Dremels [handheld electric multipurpose tools] just waiting for something to hack.”

Geekspace also offers classes in microcontroller technology such as Arduino—a popular method of building electric circuits using household items—as well as 3D printing and design.

Printing organs or weapons? 

Access and training in 3D printing, among digital fabrication technologies, is one of the core functions of many makerspaces. Three-dimensional printing is a type of machining process through which computer images can be reproduced as solid objects in virtually any form. Unlike traditional manufacturing, instead of cutting shapes out of metal or plastic, 3D printers build the objects one layer at a time.

Photo of a 3-D printer

A 3-D printer

These technologies have been the subject of a great deal of hype. In April 2012, the Economist published an article declaring that “3D printing, easy-to-use robots and new collaborative manufacturing services available online,” could help spawn a third industrial revolution.

Researchers have contemplated the possibility that 3D printers could one day be used to replicate human organs or food. One roadblock to any type of replication is cost; 3D printers are expensive. A maker can buy one for several hundred dollars, but a commercial grade 3D printer can cost more than $3,000.

“We have five or six (3D printers) in our organization. Why spend the money on the printer when you can use on the cost of the materials,” said Peters. “The materials are expensive.”

Three-dimensional printing has been used to build prototypes of toys, tools, even guns. It is considered much cheaper to make a patentable prototype from a 3D printer than to hire a manufacturer to build one. Look for the maker community to find more shortcuts like this. Designing and making a one-of-a-kind item is an experience that should remind all of us that, despite what the big stores say, one size doesn’t fit all.

Ben Smith can be reached at benzmyth@gmail.com

About Ben Smith

Columnist Ben Smith is filling in for his wife, Michelle Hiskey, as she takes a break from this column to finish writing her memoir, “Trophy Girl.” He is a veteran reporter and website designer who has freelanced articles for The Toronto Star, CNN, AOL.com, the Daily Report, among other publications. He worked at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution for 22 years covering primarily politics and government. Ben earned his bachelor’s degree in English from the University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. Ben and Michelle live in Decatur with their two terrific daughters.

- See more at: http://saportareport.com/blog/2013/08/atlantas-makers-and-the-next-industrial-revolution/#sthash.RU2VhFSY.dpuf

Mini Mini Mini was a BIG Success!

It was standing room only at the Sandy Springs Library Saturday for the Mini Mini Mini Maker Faire exhibit. Geared towards the young adult members, over 75 guests and 10 makers participated in the afternoon event. Special thanks to Marlan Brinkley, the Teen Services Librarian, for hosting the event. Resources and contacts for the event are listed for those who want to reach out and learn more about the programs and makers they saw.

Marlan Brinkley

Teen Services Librarian

Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System

Sandy Springs Branch Library

395 Mt. Vernon Hwy NE?Atlanta, GA 30328

Telephone: 404.303.6130?Efax: 404.335.5867?Email: marlan.brinkley@fultoncountyga.gov

www.afpls.org

 

Atlanta Mini Maker Faire

David Sluder

ATLMiniMakerFaire@gmail.com

http://www.MakerFaireATL.com

 

Copper Dancer Designs

Julia Benson-Slaughter

http://copperdancerdesigns.com

julia@copperdancerdesigns.com

 

Decatur Maker Space

email: decaturmakers@gmail.com

website: http://www.decaturmakers.org

facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Decatur-Makers/345280595589864

 

Freeside Atlanta

Steven Sutton

PR@Freeside.org

Join our Facebook group: FreesideATL

Join our Meetup group: Freeside-Atlanta

 

Geekspace Gwinnett

Shapeways remote 3D printing -Chris Hill?chill12gsu@gmail.com

Raspberry Pi – Steve Peters speters228@charter.net

 

HYREL LLC

Dan Hutchinson

www.hyrel3d.com

hyrel3d@gmail.com

(404)-914-1748

 

Maker Scout

Kimberly Varney

http://www.MakerScout.com

MakerScout@TheFoundery.org

(404) 919-5108

 

Maker Camp

http://makezine.com/maker-camp/

 

The Science of Fun

Kris Webb

thescienceoffun@gmail.com

www.thescienceoffun.org

404-969-2161

Google Signs on as Presenting Sponsor for Atlanta Mini Maker Faire 2013

7-google-logo-styleATLANTA, GA, Jun 03, 2013 – Atlanta Mini Maker Faire returns to Georgia Tech on Saturday, October 26th. Google, which has a data center in Douglas County and an office in Atlanta, is sponsoring the third annual event.

A celebration of “makers,” the Atlanta Mini Maker Faire is a free, family-friendly showcase of everything from robots, electric cars, 3D printers, vintage computing, textiles, painting, artificial intelligence, music, sculptures, crafts, home fabrication, and much more! Atlanta Mini Maker Faire’s mission is to entertain, inform, connect and inspire thousands of Makers and aspiring Makers.

Watch “BattleBots” go head to head. Ride a bicycle made entirely of wood! Build your own circuit board. Draw in 3D. Play catch with a robot! And meet thousands of other enthusiasts, builders, educators, students, tinkerers, hobbyists, artists, speakers, and experts from every field. Participate in interactive exhibits on everything from environmentalism to time travel. Woodworking to metallurgy. There’s no telling what you’ll find among the hundreds of exhibitions at the Atlanta Mini Maker Faire. So that you don’t miss a thing, activities and speakers will be streamed live on air via Google+ Hangouts.

Often called “The Biggest Show (and Tell) on Earth,” the original Maker Faire in San Mateo, California has inspired countless cities to produce their own Mini Maker Faires, spreading the “maker” movement and a do-it-yourself (DIY) mindset across the world. With over 6,000 in attendance last year, and the generous sponsorship of Google, this year’s Atlanta Mini Maker Faire promises to be the biggest one yet!

The Atlanta Mini Maker Faire will be held Saturday, October 26th from 10am to 5pm at Georgia Tech. For more information visit makerfaireatl.com

About Google Inc.

Google is a global technology leader focused on improving the ways people connect with information. Google’s innovations in web search and advertising have made its website a top Internet property and its brand one of the most recognized in the world.

 About Maker Media

Maker Media is a global platform for connecting makers with each other, with products and services, and with our partners. Through media, events and ecommerce, Maker Media serves a growing community of makers who bring a DIY mindset to technology. The launch of MAKE Magazine in 2005, followed by Maker Faire in 2006, jumpstarted a worldwide Maker Movement, which is transforming innovation, culture and education. Located in Sebastopol, CA, Maker Media is the publisher of MAKE Magazine and the producer of Maker Faire. It also develops “getting started” kits and books that are sold in its Maker Shed store as well as in retail channels.

Contact:

Kimberly Varney

atlminimakerfaire@gmail.com

tel: 404-919-5108

Images and Logos available: http://makerfaireatl.com/media/

Twitter @atlmakerfaire  | Facebook.com/ATLMMF | Google+ Atlanta Mini Maker Faire

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Call for Makers! A Mini Mini Maker Faire in Sandy Springs this summer!

Atlanta Mini Maker Faire has been invited to the Sandy Springs Public Library to introduce their teen members to Makers and Maker Faires. We’re looking for a good half-dozen Makers to come and contribute to a mini display and presentation. Interactive activities, robots, and other teen-friendly makers are encouraged. This is a great opportunity to showcase the Atlanta Maker community. RSVP if you’ll come, and email us if you’d like to present.

http://www.meetup.com/Atlanta-Makers/events/111935682/

Sandy Springs